Your Ultimate East Africa Beach Guide

And now for my final..and favourite East African beaches! Last and certainly not least…wait for it…wait for it… Part 3!

It is customary to save the best for last, so here we go!

It pains me to write about my last but also favourite beach spots in East Africa…You know when you have a juicy secret and you kind of want to share it but at the same time you know you shouldn’t? This is how I feel. Next thing, everyone is flocking to my favourite beach and it becomes less and less special every single time I go because I see all of you there ALL THE TIME?!?! Let me try and not be selfish.  Where do I even start!

Sunset’s hit different in Lamu

My favourite beach towns in East Africa and Kenya are…In no particular order, but if you follow me on IG (beeinrsa) you will know the exact order:

  1. Lamu
  2. Kilifi
  3. Watamu
  4. Diani

Nestled an hour away by flight from Nairobi you will honestly experience some of the best beaches in the world. Crystal clear water, white sands, ridiculously good Swahili food, the friendliest of people and never-ending sunshine. I’m not making this up, but all 4 of the above beaches have made me feel like I’ve died and actually ended up in Heaven.  The first time I landed in Lamu and I had to take a water “uber” to get to the actual Island I knew that is where I wanted to get married! No boyfriend, no ring, but I was like…One day is one day Lamu (Update two my favourite people got married in Lamu last week and it was MAGICAL)!

Business Class Uber

The area is breath-taking! It is the perfect balance of old coast culture and architecture and modern day ..nothing. You feel like you’ve been thrown into this beautiful time capsule where everything has stood still and you are just a silent observer of people going about their days and lives. From early morning Dhow rides and feasting on Captain I’ll Be Back’s mum’s fish samosas to spending hours at the dinner table gorging on Swahili delicacies and all the Mandazis you can eat.  Lamu is nothing short of magical. It’s the kind of place where you can consume 10 glasses of G&T in a day and not be hungover the next day (and yes this is a proven fact; I attempt to disprove it every single time I go).  The Wi-Fi signal is crap in most houses you go to which adds to the allure of the beach life; unplugging and simply being. There’s arts and crafts, there’s yoga, there’s mangroves and there’s secluded beach bars! It even has a floating bar (A very recent and treasured addition). I really don’t want to say more about the Island for fear of ruining it or spurring you on to see it faster…Useful Hint: like most other beaches in Kenya, the house option is the best option. Hotels are a thing of the past and are limited. They are also extremely expensive. And yes give me a shout, I am happy to give you all of the suggestions on houses to stay at and activities to do and guides to show you the lay of the land. The one thing that is for sure is that Lamu emotionally moves you. I don’t know anyone who’s been to Lamu and not felt some sort of spiritual alignment with themselves.

Watamu and Diana are also very different…Whilst Lamu has an old-world charm mixed in with some strong Arabic influences, these two have the strangest Italian influence. Rumour is this started when Italy had a major crackdown on the mafia and Italian families started emigrating to you guessed it, Kenya! Lo and behold Trump’s favourite, Chain migration started! You spend your days lounging by the beach or a pool and having fresh gelato from one of the million Italian gelato shops! It is truly blissful.  The food is amazing, the people are the friendliest and everyone is extremely content. Again, houses before hotels..book yourself a boat ride on the creek..go snorkeling in Diana…Go tubing in Kilifi…Go skydiving in Diana (I have done this about 4 times now) and try not have a heart attack at how perfect everything is.

A G&T a day

 I really cannot be too prescriptive about these beach destinations…I am however open to answering any and all questions on budgeting for trips, my favourite houses / hotels, my favourite foods, what holiday and beachwear to bring, cultural norms (please do cover up in Lamu as it is a very Muslim town when you leave Shela) and even when is the best time to take this trip! Questions? Comments? Drop me a line on here or on my IG! Slide into my DMs and make your dream holiday a reality!

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Why Ethiopia needs to be on your bucket list.

Oh just hanging at the Danakil Depression…

Yes, the above is as surprising to you as it is to 25-year-old me! At 25, I was in my fourth year of investment banking… I was covering the continent and got in copious amounts of traveling. I unfortunately always went to bigger hubs for work…Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt, Accra, London, Singapore etc.

A random Easter a friend in Nairobi decided to put together a trip to Ethiopia. I wont lie… As a South African I had no actual knowledge of Ethiopia… all I can really remember is the Michael Jackson song ‘we are the world’   which paraded starving African kids and asked for you to give… when people said starving Africans. Ethiopia is what came to mind…So now being a resident of East Africa I was adamant to learn more and stop being an ignorant South African.  Boy, did I learn a thing or two.

The trip was off to a bumpy start when I landed and realized I didn’t bring my yellow fever card. I own three yellow fever cards because I keep forgetting them and Kenya keeps insisting that I pay for a new one (final solution was me taking a photo and always having a digital copy).  So I landed and ofcourse my three friends had their yellow fever cards (I’d landed the day before from Zambia and clearly missed the memo). I’d shame them now for not reminding me, but this is a fundamental that you shouldn’t forget when traveling to a lot of African countries.  I flashed the charming young fellow showing us where to go to pay for a visa an innocent smile and prayed that he would let me through. Which he did !!! The catch was that as a South African I didn’t need a yellow fever card, but as a Kenyan resident I needed one. I convinced him that I’d just flown through Kenya and was in no danger. If he’s somehow reading this…I’m sorry!!!

 But the game was afoot!!! I was in Ethiopia to see some of the most incredible things on this continent that I wasn’t even aware existed 2 years prior.  I spent five glorious days in desert heat and I couldn’t have been happier.  What is that? What were the biggest highlights of the trip even when they were touristy? I thought you’d never ask …

  • Salt Farms in Makale. Farmers still lead their camels for 7 days to these ‘farms’ to breakdown and transport salt blocks all across Ethiopia in 40 degress Celsius weather (10 Fahrenheit) and yes I saw the most gorgeous Ethiopian men I’ve ever seen and my first camel caravans.
All in a day’s work for these salt farmers
  • The Danakil Depression. I’m at a loss for words. This is the closest I’ve felt to another universe in my life. It is so hard to put into words. The depression is in the northern part of the Afar Triangle or Afar Depression in Ethiopia, a geological depression that has resulted from the divergence of three tectonic plates in the Horn of Africa. Think multicolored sand and water and what I imagine tripping on acid to feel like. I could not get over the colours, the heat and the strange wind that made it feel like I was in a star wars universe.
The awesome foursome and our guide at the site
  • Erta Ale – We hiked up 10kms at 8pm at night to stand 50m away from the mouth of the most active volcano in Ethiopia which last erupted in 2008.  It spews lava daily and one of the people on our trip cut his leg as he fell though the fresh lava. Can you say yikes! And yes as soon as he cut his leg I froze in place and opted to walk myself back to our camp that overlooked the volcano and where we were to sleep under the stars for the night.  And yes for the peanut gallery – I just kept thinking of my mother who would have no sympathy for a cut leg because she would ask me who asked me to go to the middle of the desert and stand that close to a live volcano. The smell was atrocious, think rotten eggs in a hot room you can’t leave, but all worth is for a night sleeping underneath the most stars I’ve ever seem in a sky.
Yes, we really shouldn’t have been this close to Erta Ale
  • Gaet’ale Pond – saltiest body of water in the world. Yes, I did not know that when I went!!! Amazing swim and super refreshing break from driving across the desert. It also punctuated our never ending drives across the desert and what we referred to as an African massage (Being body slammed against each other in the SUV because of the bumpy desert), it did the work though.
  • Amazing Ethiopian kids we met along camps…and yes again…they firstly thought I was Ethiopian because my hair was curly…turns out I don’t speak a lick of the local dialect and then then thought I was Japanese…or American… lesson to all: black people please visit your African brothers so kids don’t think we are Japanese because they can’t place non-Ethiopian blacks…..
  • Amazing driver who spoke Italian – I’m not sure I need to say more. Whilst I don’t speak a word of Italian, I can confess I did not mind at all. A friend got to practice his Italian and I had a chance to be awed by a good-looking Ethiopian man who spoke 4 languages.
  • Addis Night scene – the awesome foursome broke apart and one pair went  see some of the earliest churches in the world…Archie and your friend here obviously went back to the capital for an experience in night clubs before heading back to work Sunday afternoon.  Beautiful people, amazing music and just an amazing vibe all around.
  • Food glorious food – Once we left the desert we had our fair share of Ethiopian cuisine. Ethiopian cuisine (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ as Wikipedia just told me) usually consists of vegetable and spicy meat dishes.  If you know me, you will know that nothing makes me happier than gobbling down some spicy food.  I gorged on stew, injera (a large sourdough flatbread made out of fermented teff flour), Beef Tibs and Shiro (I didn’t know a vegetarian dish could taste so good).  I felt like a kid in a candy shop. I basically had to roll myself back to our hotel both days.  Please don’t get me started on the coffee!!!
I could have this for every meal. *Every* *Single* *Meal*
As hot as it was, this coffee was surprisingly refreshing.

Things I won’t miss about this trip…

  • Pasta – Because I spent most of the 5 days in the desert there really weren’t many opportunities to partake in fresh food. Which meant that pasta and some sort of canned tomato sauce was the order of the day most days. Most of the arears we went to did not have electricity which was great as it game us an opportunity to unplug, but it also meant that most things were salted or canned!
  • No internet – Even when we were in the capital there was a crackdown on dissonance, so the state shut off everyone’s wifi connections. I kid you not, you live and learn. So we basically just had to ask out way around as we couldn’t google directions and we couldn’t check our emails (Did I actually just say I hated this?!?!?!?!)

All in all, I learnt a lot. I was astounded by how amazing the people, country and food were. There’s so much I didn’t see, and I would recommend this trip to any and everyone. The tour company we used was efficient, affordable and generally really good! On my next trip I think I’ll try and hit up some of the churches.

Camel Caravans going to pick up salt
The range of colours in the desert was breathtaking!